Standing on the Venetian island Lazzaretto Vecchio, once a trading place, later home to quarantine victims of the plague, and currently in the process of being made into a museum. 

Standing on the Venetian island Lazzaretto Vecchio, once a trading place, later home to quarantine victims of the plague, and currently in the process of being made into a museum. 

Model I created with Mya Kessler for Coen+Partners based on their current project for the Minneapolis Park Board. The model and project design was shown to the park board yesterday and received positive reviews! This project is for a partnership with Students for Design Activism and Coen+Partners

Model I created with Mya Kessler for Coen+Partners based on their current project for the Minneapolis Park Board. The model and project design was shown to the park board yesterday and received positive reviews! This project is for a partnership with Students for Design Activism and Coen+Partners

marshall model 2
Preparing for my concerts in graduate school at Towson University; photo by my good friend,  Brian Hughes.

Preparing for my concerts in graduate school at Towson University; photo by my good friend,  Brian Hughes.

Marshall overlook
Watershed Event On Friday, I saw the culmination of an event that I co-planned called Watershed Event. It brought together practitioners: landscape architects, planners, and policy makers in addition to members of the general public. In all, over 150 people attended and an excellent discussion/symposium brought up questions about how we view, use, regulate, and personally/spiritually relate to water. In all, so satisfying to see the engagement with difficult questions that will affect our future, yet by dealing with them now, we set ourselves up for hope and promise through working collectively.

Watershed Event

On Friday, I saw the culmination of an event that I co-planned called Watershed Event. It brought together practitioners: landscape architects, planners, and policy makers in addition to members of the general public. In all, over 150 people attended and an excellent discussion/symposium brought up questions about how we view, use, regulate, and personally/spiritually relate to water. In all, so satisfying to see the engagement with difficult questions that will affect our future, yet by dealing with them now, we set ourselves up for hope and promise through working collectively.

Emergent: Capstone presentation On Monday, 5/12, I presented my final capstone boards. The project had a great response from my committee and the audience members and I'm excited to share the work with stakeholders in New York in the coming months. Emergent: Newtown Creek is about the opportunity to change the legacy of industry while at the same time embracing its heritage and making Newtown Creek a known and accessible space. The creek is on the border between Brooklyn (south) and Queens (north) and has been used by industries for over 150 years—both a boon for the urban growth of New York and the cause of degradation of the creek ecology which has become so intense that it now has a greater potential to impact human health.

Emergent: Capstone presentation

On Monday, 5/12, I presented my final capstone boards. The project had a great response from my committee and the audience members and I'm excited to share the work with stakeholders in New York in the coming months. Emergent: Newtown Creek is about the opportunity to change the legacy of industry while at the same time embracing its heritage and making Newtown Creek a known and accessible space. The creek is on the border between Brooklyn (south) and Queens (north) and has been used by industries for over 150 years—both a boon for the urban growth of New York and the cause of degradation of the creek ecology which has become so intense that it now has a greater potential to impact human health.

Music and Landscape Architecture musings

 

The duality of music-in-time and space-in-time are now in sync in my hands when I draw or write or play and in my feet when I journey through a place. The rhythm of the landscape is as present to me as the yearning melodies of Chopin, the rhythmic swagger of Prokofiev, or the fierce riffs of Miles Davis. I'm an unimposing chimera, perhaps, with a penchant for learning and a drive to be active. 

When I design, I listen, because I like my work to respond to the people who are impacted by it. My experience now ranges from design-build of a rain garden for the Minneapolis Institute of Arts to Master planning a Superfund Site for my capstone project. This year, much of my focus has been on a community garden called the Aurora/St. Anthony Peace Sanctuary Garden, helping them to plan a new garden design that incorporates a children's garden program and promotes garden education. We're happy to announce that we got a grant to work on the creation of an exciting organization called the Urban Farm and Garden Alliance, dedicated to bringing healthy food practices and education to the neighborhood.   Though a work in progress, the entry sequence for the garden is below—I'm still roughing out the plan for the rest of the space.

In-progress perspective of the Aurora/St. Anthony Peace Garden entry

In-progress perspective of the Aurora/St. Anthony Peace Garden entry